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Picture of Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou, Morocco, photo by Photographer Paul E Williams. Ait Benhaddou is an old ksar, fortified village, at the mouth of the Ounila valley that leads up to the Tizi n'Tichka pass through the Atlas mountains to Marrakesh. Fortified in the 11th century Ait Benhaddou became an important trading centre and stop over for the camel trains that transported luxury goods across the Sahara desert which eventually much of which would end up in the markets of Europe. A chain of Ksar's run along the route to Marrakesh but Ait Benhaddou became a trading centre in its own right. Ait Benhaddou is on the baks of the Ounila River that dries to a trickle in the summer and is fed by the melting snows of the Atlas mountains in spring. Ait-Ben-Haddou comprises spectacular adobe clay brick palaces with defensive towers as well as simple square adobe houses all of which shelter against a steep rocky outcrop and are surrounded by a substantial adobe fortified wall. A pathway from the village leads up to the top of the hill which has another defensive wall all around it and houses granaries. The more lavish buildings are decorated with traditional Berber designs and many of the towers are topped with colossal storks nests. Ait-Ben-Haddou is one of the best preserved examples of traditional Berber ksar's in Morocco. Although some of the buildings have become Hotels there is still s Berber community living at Ait Benhaddou who grown cereal crops outside the walls of the Ksar and thresh their harvest as their ancestors have done for over 1000 years. It is so well preserved that it has been used as a locations in many feature films such as Oedipus Rex (1967), The Man Who Would Be King (film) (1975), Time Bandits, Gladiator and many many more. Ait-Ben-Haddou is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Photo art prints of Aït Benhaddou by photographer Paul E Williams can be bought on line for worldwide delivery.
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© 2022 Photographer Paul E Williams all rights reserved
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TOWERING DELUSIONS - Colour Art Photos of Historic Castles Chateau by Photographer Paul E Williams
Picture of Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou, Morocco,  photo by Photographer Paul E Williams.  Ait Benhaddou is an old ksar, fortified village, at the mouth of the Ounila valley that leads up to the Tizi n'Tichka  pass through the Atlas mountains to Marrakesh. Fortified in the 11th century Ait Benhaddou became an important trading centre and stop over for the camel trains that transported luxury goods across the Sahara desert which eventually much of which would end up in the markets of Europe. A chain of Ksar's run along the route to Marrakesh but Ait Benhaddou became a trading centre in its own right. Ait Benhaddou is on the baks of the Ounila River that dries to a trickle in the summer and is fed by the melting snows of the Atlas mountains in spring. Ait-Ben-Haddou comprises spectacular adobe clay brick palaces with defensive towers as well as simple square adobe houses all of which shelter against a steep rocky outcrop and are surrounded by a substantial adobe fortified wall. A pathway from the village leads up to the top of the hill which has another defensive wall all around it and houses granaries. The more lavish buildings are decorated with traditional Berber designs and many of the towers are topped with colossal storks nests. Ait-Ben-Haddou is one of the best preserved examples of traditional Berber ksar's in Morocco. Although some of the buildings have become Hotels there is still s Berber community living at Ait Benhaddou who grown cereal crops outside the walls of the Ksar and thresh their harvest as their ancestors have done for over 1000 years. It is so well preserved that it has been used as a locations in many feature films such as Oedipus Rex (1967), The Man Who Would Be King (film) (1975), Time Bandits, Gladiator and many many more. Ait-Ben-Haddou is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. <br />
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Photo art prints of Aït Benhaddou   by photographer Paul E Williams  can be bought on line for worldwide delivery.