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SERIES: Sacred Stone
TITLE: Mount Nemrut No1
LOCATION: Turkey
DATE: 20/07/2018,

Photos of of Mount Nemrut Dağı summit ancient statues of the Hellenistic mausoleum of Antiochus I. (Mount Nemrut or Nemrud), Turkey. Photos by photographer Paul E Williams from the Sacred Stone Series

"The journey to see the mausoleum at its summit requires a drive up the 2,134 m high mount Nemrut then a walk. The reward for the effort is one of the great tourist destinations of Anatolian Turkey and the world. The view over the Euphrates valley at sunrise of sunset is breathtaking and the statue heads, that used to sit on giant statues bodies guarding the tomb, are really quite extraordinary. The memory of a visit to Mount Nemrut will never be lost as the whole experience is so special" Paul.

In the first century BC, the Roman-Persian king Antiochus I of Commagene (a kingdom north of Syria and the Euphrates) ordered to build a tomb on the summit of Mount Nemrut and place statues the west and East sides. The mountain top terraces of Mount Nemrut had four meter high statues of ancient gods and Antiochus. The statues represent Apollo, Fortuna, Heracles, Commagene and Zeus.

The Tomb stands on the top of Mount Nemrut at 2,134 m (7,001 ft) high. It is thought that the top of the mountain was levelled and then the Mausoleum built on it, although no burial chamber has yet been found. After Antiochus death all of the people of his kingdom were ordered to bring a small stone to the top of the mountain from which a loose stone pyramid shaped tumulus was made 49 m (161 ft) high and 152 m (499 ft) in diameter over a mausoleum. This has protected the mausoleum, if one exists, as to get to it the whole tumulus would have to be removed. This has remained a problem for Archaeologists who cannot yet tunnel in the loose stones to see if the Mount Nemrut mausoleum exists.

Photo art prints of Mount Nemrut can be bought on line.
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Copyright 2022 Photographer Paul E Williams All rights reserved
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SACRED STONE - Iconic Places and Monuments by Photographer Paul E Williams
SERIES: Sacred Stone<br />
TITLE: Mount Nemrut No1<br />
LOCATION: Turkey<br />
DATE: 20/07/2018, <br />
<br />
Photos of of Mount Nemrut Dağı summit ancient statues of the Hellenistic mausoleum of Antiochus I. (Mount Nemrut or Nemrud), Turkey. Photos by photographer Paul E Williams from the Sacred Stone Series <br />
<br />
"The journey to see the mausoleum at its summit requires a drive up the 2,134 m high mount Nemrut then a walk. The reward for the effort is one of the great tourist destinations of Anatolian Turkey and the world. The view over the Euphrates valley at sunrise of sunset is breathtaking and the statue heads, that used to sit on giant statues bodies guarding the tomb, are really quite extraordinary. The memory of a visit to Mount Nemrut will never be lost as the whole experience is so special" Paul.<br />
<br />
 In the first century BC, the Roman-Persian king Antiochus I of Commagene (a kingdom north of Syria and the Euphrates) ordered to build a tomb on the summit of Mount Nemrut and place statues the west and East sides. The mountain top terraces of Mount Nemrut had four meter high statues of ancient gods and Antiochus. The statues represent Apollo, Fortuna, Heracles, Commagene and Zeus.<br />
<br />
 The Tomb stands on the top of Mount Nemrut at 2,134 m (7,001 ft) high. It is thought that the top of the mountain was levelled and then the Mausoleum built on it, although no burial chamber has yet been found. After Antiochus death all of the people of his kingdom were ordered to bring a small stone to the top of the mountain from which a loose stone pyramid shaped tumulus was made 49 m (161 ft) high and 152 m (499 ft) in diameter over a mausoleum. This has protected the mausoleum, if one exists, as to get to it the whole tumulus would have to be removed. This has remained a problem for Archaeologists who cannot yet tunnel in the loose stones to see if the Mount Nemrut mausoleum exists. <br />
<br />
Photo art prints of Mount Nemrut can be bought on line.