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Mycenaean pottery . Piriform Jar with repeated swirl design, 1500-1450 BC, Mycenaean cemetery of Dendra. Nafplio Archaeological Museum. . Against black background. Photographer Paul E Williams.

The Mycenaean cemetery of Dendra is on the west side of the citadel of Midea. It comprises tholos tombs and 16 densly arranged chamber tombs carved into the bedrock. Burial pits were dug into the floor of the chambers and the entrance passageways which were used for successive burials. The entrance passageways (dromoi) were also used fro rituals with smashed drinking vessels indicating communal ceremonies. There is also evidence of ritual sacrifices with the burial of horses outside the tombs. Rich tomb finds have been made in this Dendra cemetery accompanying burials from the Midea palace centre.

The most common Mycenaean archaeological finds are examples of Mycenaean pottery. The potter's wheel was developed in the Near East around 3500 BC and 2000 years later, during the Late Helladic period, Mycenaeans adopted it. This led the Mycenaeans to produce fine pottery with hand painted decorations that was exported throughout the eastern Mediterranean. Mycenaean decorations are a continuation of the styles used by the earlier Minoans of Crete. Popular deigns were floral patterns, marine and octopus designs and swirling circular designs.

The Mycenaeans were a Bronze Age Culture found primarily in mainland Greece in city states such as Thebes, Mycenae and Tiryns. The Mycenaean civilisation spanned the period from approximately 1750 to 1050 BC and ended abruptly during the collapse of Bronze Age culture in the eastern Mediterranean, to be followed by the so-called Greek Dark Ages.
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Nafplion Archaeological Museum Mycenaean Antiquity Collection - Photo image pictures of, Mycenaean Pottery Museum Antiquities - Photos Images Pictures, Nafplion Archaeological Museum Mycenaean Greek Antiquities - Photos Images Pictures of, Mycenaean Art - Pictures of Mycenaean Frescoes, & Pottery. Photos & Images.
Mycenaean pottery . Piriform Jar with repeated swirl design, 1500-1450 BC, Mycenaean cemetery of Dendra. Nafplio Archaeological Museum. . Against black background. Photographer Paul E Williams. <br />
<br />
The Mycenaean cemetery of Dendra is on the west side of the citadel of Midea. It comprises tholos tombs and 16 densly arranged chamber tombs carved into the bedrock. Burial pits were dug into the floor of the chambers and the entrance passageways which were used for successive burials. The entrance passageways (dromoi) were also used fro rituals with smashed drinking vessels indicating communal ceremonies. There is also evidence of ritual sacrifices with the burial of horses outside the tombs. Rich tomb finds have been made in this Dendra cemetery accompanying burials from the Midea palace centre. <br />
<br />
The most common Mycenaean archaeological finds are examples of Mycenaean pottery. The potter's wheel was developed in the Near East around 3500 BC and 2000 years later, during the Late Helladic period, Mycenaeans adopted it. This led the Mycenaeans to produce fine pottery with hand painted decorations that was exported throughout the eastern Mediterranean.  Mycenaean decorations are a continuation of the styles used by the earlier Minoans of Crete. Popular deigns were floral patterns, marine and octopus designs and swirling circular designs. <br />
<br />
The Mycenaeans were a Bronze Age Culture found primarily in mainland Greece in city states such as Thebes, Mycenae and Tiryns. The Mycenaean civilisation spanned the period from approximately 1750 to 1050 BC and ended abruptly during the collapse of Bronze Age culture in the eastern Mediterranean, to be followed by the so-called Greek Dark Ages.